Thursday, 27 March 2008

My View.

I've lost count of the number of times I've posted this view. The thing is, I never tire of it. Even after nearly twelve years.

It changes, not just by the day, but by the hour. It's my barometer, my soother, my anchor. And it makes washing the dishes a nicer experience!



There's the Sugarloaf. And Slaughter Hill. Djouce in the distance. And the little Sugarloaf. And all the way over to the north, Bray Head. They can't all be seen in this picture. Some days none can be seen. (For more moments of this view have a look here).

But it's my constant. Always there. And it reminds me that even with all the different weather fronts life throws at us, the mountain that is 'I' remains the same.

9 comments:

Patrick's-Well said...

Did you think of making a calendar of the view, i.e. a different seasonal shot for each month of the year?

zee said...

Wow wow wow. Those photos are unbelievable!

Ciara said...

Patrick's-Well: Not a bad idea! I'm looking forward to seeing the reeds greening up gradually over the next few months.

Zee: Thank you! It's a nice way of keeping something fresh and new to my eyes.

Esti said...

I thin Patrick's well's idea is great! Go for it!

The Dirt Dude said...

I think Patrick's Well's idea is a great one, too!

I have a question: does the weather always come in from the same direction? Or does is swirl around? And how long before the storm hits can you see it coming? Just curious.

twiggypeasticks said...

That is a stunning view. I love Ireland and we spend a fair bit of time visiting Co.Cork but have never visited Co.Wicklow, we must.
Lovely blog too!!
Twiggy

Ciara said...

Hey Dirt Dude. You know I think I'll let Jay answer that one!
Twiggy: It really is called the Garden of Ireland! (And me a true Dublin lass!)

the 18th of may said...

H Mike - Just in answer to your question about the weather. having watched it for the last 12 years we seem to have a little microclimate here on the east coast of Wicklow. Even heavy cloud such as you see in the photo can get 'stuck' on the mountains and avoid us altogether. The times we get really drenched here are when we have a southeasterly wind which brings a lot of warm air up from the Bay of Biscay and pisses all over us for weeks. otherwise we remain drier than the rest of the county, although that's not saying much...

Patrick's-Well said...

I think I experienced that southeasterly when I walked on one occasion along the railway line path between Kilcoole & Greystones. Literally, out of nowhere, horizontal blinding rain/deluge made an all-out assault, letting me know I had nowhere to run. Apart from that, the weather is usually great, or occasionally quirky/lively, as elsewhere.